Aussie sporting talent Nanscawen plays 100th hockey game

GEELONG legend and Australian Football Hall of Famer, Edward 'Carji' Greeves was 20 when he made history in 1924 by becoming the inaugural Brownlow medallist.

At the same age Greeves was immortalised, his great-great niece Georgia Nanscawen also made history after becoming the youngest player to play 100 internationals for the Hockeyroos.

The Melbourne-born Nanscawen was 20 years and 336 days old when she reached three figures in the fourth and final Test against Korea in Perth on Sunday.

The Koreans gave her little reason to celebrate though, winning 3-1 to draw the series 2-2.

The previous youngest player to reach a century of games was Queenslander Karen Smith who was 21 when she made her 100th appearance against China in 2000.

Nanscawen was just 16 when she was first selected for the Hockeyroos for the tour of South Africa in 2009 - she made her international debut just a day after she turned 17.

Speaking from Perth where she is now based, Nanscawen yesterday said it was still sinking in that she had just played her 100th game.

"It has all been a bit of a blur since I made my debut to be honest," the red-haired striker, who has scored 17 goals in her international career so far, said.

"I never imagined in my wildest dreams that I would have played this many games by the time I reached 20 - it all feels a bit surreal."

Nanscawen never got to meet her famous great-great uncle, as the Cats' champion passed way in 1963, but she has no doubt footy is in her blood.

"Mum reckons I could banana kick a Sherrin by the time I was three," she said with a laugh.

"I don't remember that, but I can still do it because we warm-up for hockey by kicking a ball around."

But does she support the Cats, a club which still honours her great-great uncle, who also finished second three times in Brownlow counts, with the annual best and fairest trophy - the Carji Greeves medal?

"That's a story in itself," Nanscawen laughed.

"Mum goes for the Cats, while dad cheers for Melbourne. Before I was born they agreed I would support whoever won the game between the two teams - Melbourne did, so there is your answer."


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