When you hit someone, owning up is more than just courtesy - it's actually the law.
When you hit someone, owning up is more than just courtesy - it's actually the law. DEN HOLLANDER DERRICK

Car park bingles are something worth noting

IN THIS day and age, there's something really special about getting a handwritten letter. Especially the kind that comes flapping in the breeze, carefully positioned under your windscreen wiper, usually on the back of an old receipt.

After being the unlucky victim of many a door ding, car park bump and other hit-and-run type acts during my time on the road, I know all too well the warm, fuzzy feeling of getting one of those special notes.

A simple sorry goes a long way nowadays, as does being provided a name, an address, phone and registration numbers and insurance details. It's an easy first step to getting the vehicle repaired and back on the road.

What many drivers don't realise is when you hit someone, owning up is more than just courtesy - it's actually the law. You should also report the incident to Policelink on 131444, especially if you can't locate the owner.

If the guilt alone doesn't get the better of you, by not providing your details, you could also be charged with an offence. It's not something you want on your record or conscience.

If you do the wrong thing, bring yourself some good 'car-ma' and whip out a pen or your phone, and go the extra mile to make it right.


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